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  • Pocket Modelling kit

    Posted on September 28th, 2014 rudrarup No comments

    Matchstick Model (Diamond)Organic and inorganic chemistry has been a very tricky subject for all students. You have to imagine the structure of the molecule. We have been allways doing them on the black boards. Drawing those complex 3 dimensional structures on a 2 dimensional surface can not provide us with ample structural benifits for the students to imagine the structure.

    Why not  make a cheap modelling system that can be made with daily house hold items, which can provide the students with lots of fun and in the same time teach them model making.

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  • THE STORY OF WILLIAM TELL

    Posted on September 27th, 2014 rudrarup No comments

    The people of Switzerland were not always free and happy as they are to-day. Many years ago a proud tyrant, whose name was Gessler, ruled over them, and made their lot a bitter one indeed.

    One day this tyrant set up a tall pole in the public square, and put his own cap on the top of it, and then he gave orders that every man who came into the town should bow down before it. But there was one man, named William Tell, who would not do this. He stood up straight with folded arms, and laughed at the swinging cap. He would not bow down to Gessler himself.

    When Gessler heard of this, he was very angry. He was afraid that other men would disobey, and that soon the whole country would rebel against him. So he made up his mind to punish the bold man.

    William Tell’s home was among the mountains, and he was a famous hunter. No one in all the land could shoot with bow and arrow so well as he. Gessler knew this, and so he thought of a cruel plan to make the hunter’s own skill bring him to grief. He ordered that Tell’s little boy should be made to stand up in the public square with an apple on his head, and then he bade Tell shoot the apple with one of his arrows.

    Tell begged the tyrant not to have him make this test of his skill. What if the boy should move? What if the bowman’s hand should tremble? What if the arrow should not carry true?

    “Will you make me kill my boy?” he said.

    “Say no more,” said Gessler. “You must hit the apple with your one arrow. If you fail, my soldiers shall kill the boy before your eyes.”

    Then, without another word, Tell fitted the arrow to his bow. He took aim, and let it fly. The boy stood firm and still. He was not afraid, for he had all faith in his father’s skill.

    The arrow whistled through the air. It struck the apple fairly in the center, and carried it away. The people who saw it shouted with joy.

    As Tell was turning away from the place, an arrow which he had hidden under his coat dropped to the ground.

    “Fellow!” cried Gessler, “what mean you with this second arrow?”

    “Tyrant!” was Tell’s proud answer, “this arrow was for your heart if I had hurt my child.”

    And there is an old story, that, not long after this, Tell did shoot the tyrant with one of his arrows, and thus he set his country free.

  • Periodic Table of Elements

    Posted on September 26th, 2014 rudrarup No comments

     

    The Periodic Table of Elements is a tabular display of the chemical elements, organized on a basis of their properties. Elements are presented in increasing atomic number while rectangular in general outline, gaps are included in the rows or periods to keep elements with similar properties together, such as the halogens and the noble gases, in columns or groups, forming distinct rectangular areas or blocks. Because the periodic table accurately predicts the properties of various elements and the relations between properties, its use is widespread within chemistry, providing a useful framework for analysing chemical behavior, as well as in other sciences. 

    Here is a fully functional periodic table that will help you find information about elements.

    Try the new Periodic Table.

  • Centrifugal force

    Posted on September 25th, 2014 rudrarup No comments

    When something is going straight, it always keeps going straight unless something else stops it or turns it. If it can’t go straight, then it goes as straight as it can. So when you hit a ball tied to a rope, it tries to go straight away from you. But the rope pulls on it and keeps the ball from going straight. So the ball goes as straight as it can – around the pole in a circle. That’s centrifugal force – the energy of something trying to go straight even though it can’t.

    The Earth is affected by centrifugal force. It is moving, so it tries to keep moving in a straight line. But the gravity of the Sun pulls the Earth toward it, just as the rope pulls the ball. Gravity can’t pull the Earth into the Sun, because the Earth keeps trying to go straight. So the Earth takes a middle road, going in a circle around the Sun.

    Following is a video about centrifugal force.

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  • Holi

    Posted on March 7th, 2012 rudrarup No comments

    Holi, is a spring festival of colours celebrated in India, Nepal, Pakistan, and countries with large Indian population, such as Malaysia, Guyana, South Africa, Trinidad, United Kingdom, United States, Mauritius, and Fiji. In some states of India such as West Bengal and Orissa, it is known as Doljatra or Basanta-Utsav (“spring festival”). The most celebrated Holi is in the Braj region, in locations connected to the Lord Krishna: Mathura, Vrindavan, Nandagaon, and Barsana. These places have become tourist attractions during the festive season of Holi. The main day, Holi, also known as Dhuli in Sanskrit, also Dhulheti, Dhulandi or Dhulendi, is celebrated by people throwing scented powder and perfume at each other. Bonfires are lit on the eve of the festival, also known as Holika Dahan (burning of Holika) or Chhoti Holi (little Holi). After doing holika dahan prayers are said and praise is offered. The bonfires are lit in memory of the miraculous escape that young prince Prahlad accomplished when Demoness Holika, sister of Hiranyakashipu, carried him into the fire. Holika was burnt but Prahlad, a staunch devotee of lord Vishnu, escaped without any injuries due to his unshakable devotion. Holika Dahan is referred to as Kama Dahanam in South India. Holi is celebrated at the end of the winter season on the last full moon day of the lunar month Phalguna (February/March), (Phalgun Purnima), which usually falls in the later part of February or March. In 2011, Holi was on March 20 and Holika Dahan was on March 19. This year holi will be celebrated on March 8 and holika dahan will occur on March 9. In most areas, Holi lasts about two days. One of Holi’s biggest customs is the loosening strictness of social structures, which normally include age, sex, status, and caste. Holi closes the wide gaps between social classes and brings people together. On holi, the rich and poor, women and men, enjoy each other’s presence on this joyous day. Additionally, Holi lowers the strictness of social norms. No one expects polite behavior, as a result, the atmosphere is filled with excitement and joy. Every year, thousands of people participate in the festival Holi. Waiting for the day after the full moon in the month of Phalguna, or early March, These men and women are ready to spread the joy.

    Holi has many purposes. First and foremost, it celebrates the beginning of the new season, spring. It also has a religious purpose, commemorating many events that are present in mythologies. Although it is the least religious holiday, it is probably one of the most exhilarating ones in existence. During this event, participants hold a bonfire, throw colored powder at each other, and go absolutely crazy. Originally, it was a festival that commemorated good harvests and the fertile land. In addition to celebrating the coming of spring, Holi has even greater purposes. Hindus believe it is a time of enjoying spring’s abundant colors and saying farewell to winter. Furthermore, Holi celebrates many religious myths and legends. Rangapanchami occurs a few days later on a Panchami (fifth day of the full moon), marking the end of festivities involving colours.