Did you Know: Galileo discovered the sun spots
RSS icon Email icon
  • Holi

    Posted on March 7th, 2012 rudrarup No comments

    Holi, is a spring festival of colours celebrated in India, Nepal, Pakistan, and countries with large Indian population, such as Malaysia, Guyana, South Africa, Trinidad, United Kingdom, United States, Mauritius, and Fiji. In some states of India such as West Bengal and Orissa, it is known as Doljatra or Basanta-Utsav (“spring festival”). The most celebrated Holi is in the Braj region, in locations connected to the Lord Krishna: Mathura, Vrindavan, Nandagaon, and Barsana. These places have become tourist attractions during the festive season of Holi. The main day, Holi, also known as Dhuli in Sanskrit, also Dhulheti, Dhulandi or Dhulendi, is celebrated by people throwing scented powder and perfume at each other. Bonfires are lit on the eve of the festival, also known as Holika Dahan (burning of Holika) or Chhoti Holi (little Holi). After doing holika dahan prayers are said and praise is offered. The bonfires are lit in memory of the miraculous escape that young prince Prahlad accomplished when Demoness Holika, sister of Hiranyakashipu, carried him into the fire. Holika was burnt but Prahlad, a staunch devotee of lord Vishnu, escaped without any injuries due to his unshakable devotion. Holika Dahan is referred to as Kama Dahanam in South India. Holi is celebrated at the end of the winter season on the last full moon day of the lunar month Phalguna (February/March), (Phalgun Purnima), which usually falls in the later part of February or March. In 2011, Holi was on March 20 and Holika Dahan was on March 19. This year holi will be celebrated on March 8 and holika dahan will occur on March 9. In most areas, Holi lasts about two days. One of Holi’s biggest customs is the loosening strictness of social structures, which normally include age, sex, status, and caste. Holi closes the wide gaps between social classes and brings people together. On holi, the rich and poor, women and men, enjoy each other’s presence on this joyous day. Additionally, Holi lowers the strictness of social norms. No one expects polite behavior, as a result, the atmosphere is filled with excitement and joy. Every year, thousands of people participate in the festival Holi. Waiting for the day after the full moon in the month of Phalguna, or early March, These men and women are ready to spread the joy.

    Holi has many purposes. First and foremost, it celebrates the beginning of the new season, spring. It also has a religious purpose, commemorating many events that are present in mythologies. Although it is the least religious holiday, it is probably one of the most exhilarating ones in existence. During this event, participants hold a bonfire, throw colored powder at each other, and go absolutely crazy. Originally, it was a festival that commemorated good harvests and the fertile land. In addition to celebrating the coming of spring, Holi has even greater purposes. Hindus believe it is a time of enjoying spring’s abundant colors and saying farewell to winter. Furthermore, Holi celebrates many religious myths and legends. Rangapanchami occurs a few days later on a Panchami (fifth day of the full moon), marking the end of festivities involving colours.

  • Pinhole Camera

    Posted on February 7th, 2012 rudrarup No comments

    How does a camera change a big scene into a small picture? To see for yourself, make a pinhole “camera.” Start with an empty cardboard box. Punch a hole in the center of the bottom by pushing a pencil through it.

    Now place a piece of waxed paper over the open end of the box and hold it there with tape or a rubber band. Your pinhole camera is complete.

    Sit in a dim room that has a bright object in it, such as a lamp or a window that lets in daylight. Lay a blanket over your head and the pinhole camera.

    Hold the camera at arm’s length, with the waxed paper toward you and the punched-out hole sticking out from under the blanket. Point the camera at the bright object. On the surface of the waxed paper, you will see a picture of the object—backward and upside down. Read the rest of this entry »

  • Free Graph Papar

    Posted on February 6th, 2012 rudrarup No comments

    Here is a graph paper that you can use to create your own graphs. This is made as a standard grapg paper with 8×10 inch paper. Download the PDF and print your own copies.

  • Tropical Rain Forest

    Posted on January 16th, 2012 rudrarup No comments

    Here is an activity to create a tropical rainforest of your own. Drag the animals to place. Add the arrows to connect those animals. The arrows should point from the prey to the predator animal. Arrows should represent energy transfer from one animal to another animal. Just click the following link and have fun.

    Tropical Rain Forest

  • EDUMATH

    Posted on January 11th, 2012 rudrarup No comments

    Edumath is a mathematics timed problem solving game. It helps improve the child’s arithmatic problem solving skills.

    Play EDUMATH